mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY
mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY
mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY
mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY
mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY
mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY
mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY
mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY
mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY
mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY

mindytheturtle:

tepitome:

Cake

I wanna know who made these. SO I AN EVEN MORE HUNGRY

(Source: beben-eleben)

marthajefferson:

starry-eyed-wolfchild:

The Old Butcher’s Bookshop, Paris

marthajefferson:

starry-eyed-wolfchild:

The Old Butcher’s Bookshop, Paris

marthajefferson:

starry-eyed-wolfchild:

The Old Butcher’s Bookshop, Paris

(Source: messynessychic.com)

sammiethesamoyed:

Sleepy time!
sammiethesamoyed:

Sleepy time!

sammiethesamoyed:

Sleepy time!

bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP
bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP
bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP
bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP
bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP
bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP
bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP
bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP
bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP
bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 
Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.
Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year. 
Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.
While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.
Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP

bloombergphotos:

Moon Gazing, Mooncake Grazing                                                 

Cooks prepare mooncakes at Cantonese institution Luk Yu Tea House in Hong Kong on Aug. 28, 2014.

Mooncakes are gifted during the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Lunar calendar, which lands on Sept. 8 this year.

Traditionally celebrated by the Chinese and Vietnamese as a harvest festival, families gather over a meal to share mooncakes and watch the full moon, a symbol of completeness and unity.

While mooncake styles vary from region to region, they are typically made of a sweet bean paste, such as lotus seed, surrounded by a thin crust, and some may include salted duck egg yolks in the filling. They are shaped in a wooden mold before being baked in an oven.

Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg

© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP

princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.
princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.
princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.
princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.
princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.
princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.
princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.
princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.
princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.

princesssquibcosplay:

My destiny Cosplay. For the release. Yay.

leseanthomas:

thechanelmuse:

Thirteen Year Old Pitching Phenomenon Mo’ne Davis Makes The Baseball Hall Of Fame
Look out world! That sound you hear is Mo’ne Davis’ 70mph fastball shattering the glass ceiling above a lot of little girls’ baseball caps. 
Mo’ne Davis, the thirteen-year-old girl whose stellar pitching performance in last month’s Little League World Series earned her the cover of Sports Illustrated, is about to be immortalized in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Mo’ne will visit the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, tomorrow, with her teammates from both the Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, and her longtime travel team, the Anderson Monarchs. Seventy-nine-year-old Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, one of three women to play in the Negro Leagues, and who Mo’ne lists as her “favorite old-school player” on the Monarch’s website, also plans to attend. 
Mo’ne will present Hall of Fame officials with the Taney Dragons jersey that she wore when she became the first girl to pitch a complete game shutout in the Little League World Series.  After the presentation, Mo’ne and her teammates will play an exhibition game at Doubleday Field in nearby Stamford.
Thanks to Mo’ne, “You throw like a girl” is no longer an insult. 

LOVE. 
leseanthomas:

thechanelmuse:

Thirteen Year Old Pitching Phenomenon Mo’ne Davis Makes The Baseball Hall Of Fame
Look out world! That sound you hear is Mo’ne Davis’ 70mph fastball shattering the glass ceiling above a lot of little girls’ baseball caps. 
Mo’ne Davis, the thirteen-year-old girl whose stellar pitching performance in last month’s Little League World Series earned her the cover of Sports Illustrated, is about to be immortalized in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Mo’ne will visit the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, tomorrow, with her teammates from both the Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, and her longtime travel team, the Anderson Monarchs. Seventy-nine-year-old Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, one of three women to play in the Negro Leagues, and who Mo’ne lists as her “favorite old-school player” on the Monarch’s website, also plans to attend. 
Mo’ne will present Hall of Fame officials with the Taney Dragons jersey that she wore when she became the first girl to pitch a complete game shutout in the Little League World Series.  After the presentation, Mo’ne and her teammates will play an exhibition game at Doubleday Field in nearby Stamford.
Thanks to Mo’ne, “You throw like a girl” is no longer an insult. 

LOVE. 
leseanthomas:

thechanelmuse:

Thirteen Year Old Pitching Phenomenon Mo’ne Davis Makes The Baseball Hall Of Fame
Look out world! That sound you hear is Mo’ne Davis’ 70mph fastball shattering the glass ceiling above a lot of little girls’ baseball caps. 
Mo’ne Davis, the thirteen-year-old girl whose stellar pitching performance in last month’s Little League World Series earned her the cover of Sports Illustrated, is about to be immortalized in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Mo’ne will visit the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, tomorrow, with her teammates from both the Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, and her longtime travel team, the Anderson Monarchs. Seventy-nine-year-old Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, one of three women to play in the Negro Leagues, and who Mo’ne lists as her “favorite old-school player” on the Monarch’s website, also plans to attend. 
Mo’ne will present Hall of Fame officials with the Taney Dragons jersey that she wore when she became the first girl to pitch a complete game shutout in the Little League World Series.  After the presentation, Mo’ne and her teammates will play an exhibition game at Doubleday Field in nearby Stamford.
Thanks to Mo’ne, “You throw like a girl” is no longer an insult. 

LOVE. 
leseanthomas:

thechanelmuse:

Thirteen Year Old Pitching Phenomenon Mo’ne Davis Makes The Baseball Hall Of Fame
Look out world! That sound you hear is Mo’ne Davis’ 70mph fastball shattering the glass ceiling above a lot of little girls’ baseball caps. 
Mo’ne Davis, the thirteen-year-old girl whose stellar pitching performance in last month’s Little League World Series earned her the cover of Sports Illustrated, is about to be immortalized in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Mo’ne will visit the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, tomorrow, with her teammates from both the Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, and her longtime travel team, the Anderson Monarchs. Seventy-nine-year-old Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, one of three women to play in the Negro Leagues, and who Mo’ne lists as her “favorite old-school player” on the Monarch’s website, also plans to attend. 
Mo’ne will present Hall of Fame officials with the Taney Dragons jersey that she wore when she became the first girl to pitch a complete game shutout in the Little League World Series.  After the presentation, Mo’ne and her teammates will play an exhibition game at Doubleday Field in nearby Stamford.
Thanks to Mo’ne, “You throw like a girl” is no longer an insult. 

LOVE. 
leseanthomas:

thechanelmuse:

Thirteen Year Old Pitching Phenomenon Mo’ne Davis Makes The Baseball Hall Of Fame
Look out world! That sound you hear is Mo’ne Davis’ 70mph fastball shattering the glass ceiling above a lot of little girls’ baseball caps. 
Mo’ne Davis, the thirteen-year-old girl whose stellar pitching performance in last month’s Little League World Series earned her the cover of Sports Illustrated, is about to be immortalized in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Mo’ne will visit the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, tomorrow, with her teammates from both the Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, and her longtime travel team, the Anderson Monarchs. Seventy-nine-year-old Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, one of three women to play in the Negro Leagues, and who Mo’ne lists as her “favorite old-school player” on the Monarch’s website, also plans to attend. 
Mo’ne will present Hall of Fame officials with the Taney Dragons jersey that she wore when she became the first girl to pitch a complete game shutout in the Little League World Series.  After the presentation, Mo’ne and her teammates will play an exhibition game at Doubleday Field in nearby Stamford.
Thanks to Mo’ne, “You throw like a girl” is no longer an insult. 

LOVE. 
leseanthomas:

thechanelmuse:

Thirteen Year Old Pitching Phenomenon Mo’ne Davis Makes The Baseball Hall Of Fame
Look out world! That sound you hear is Mo’ne Davis’ 70mph fastball shattering the glass ceiling above a lot of little girls’ baseball caps. 
Mo’ne Davis, the thirteen-year-old girl whose stellar pitching performance in last month’s Little League World Series earned her the cover of Sports Illustrated, is about to be immortalized in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Mo’ne will visit the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, tomorrow, with her teammates from both the Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, and her longtime travel team, the Anderson Monarchs. Seventy-nine-year-old Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, one of three women to play in the Negro Leagues, and who Mo’ne lists as her “favorite old-school player” on the Monarch’s website, also plans to attend. 
Mo’ne will present Hall of Fame officials with the Taney Dragons jersey that she wore when she became the first girl to pitch a complete game shutout in the Little League World Series.  After the presentation, Mo’ne and her teammates will play an exhibition game at Doubleday Field in nearby Stamford.
Thanks to Mo’ne, “You throw like a girl” is no longer an insult. 

LOVE. 

leseanthomas:

thechanelmuse:

Thirteen Year Old Pitching Phenomenon Mo’ne Davis Makes The Baseball Hall Of Fame

Look out world! That sound you hear is Mo’ne Davis’ 70mph fastball shattering the glass ceiling above a lot of little girls’ baseball caps. 

Mo’ne Davis, the thirteen-year-old girl whose stellar pitching performance in last month’s Little League World Series earned her the cover of Sports Illustrated, is about to be immortalized in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Mo’ne will visit the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, tomorrow, with her teammates from both the Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, and her longtime travel team, the Anderson Monarchs. Seventy-nine-year-old Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, one of three women to play in the Negro Leagues, and who Mo’ne lists as her “favorite old-school player” on the Monarch’s website, also plans to attend. 

Mo’ne will present Hall of Fame officials with the Taney Dragons jersey that she wore when she became the first girl to pitch a complete game shutout in the Little League World Series.  After the presentation, Mo’ne and her teammates will play an exhibition game at Doubleday Field in nearby Stamford.

Thanks to Mo’ne, “You throw like a girl” is no longer an insult. 

LOVE. 

thatdisneylover:

radisssh:

I DONT THINK PEOPLE UNDERSTAND HOW HARD ANIMATORS WORK

WHAT BUGS ME MOST IS WHEN ANY ANIMATED MOVIE BECOMES FAMOUS (DISNEY, PIXAR, ANIME’S, AND TV SHOWS) THE WRITER GETS 99.9999% OF THE CREDIT.

DO YOU KNOW HOW HARD IT IS TO DRAW THE SAME CHARACTER SLOWLY MOVING 24 TIMES- ONLY TO MAKE ONE SECOND OF ANIMATION?

HOW MANY SKETCHES THEY MADE?

TIGHT SCHEDULES?

PEOPLE NEED TO APPRECIATE ANIMATORS MORE. 

PREACH!